Saturday, 5 December 2009

Sarah Palin's "pregnancy": Andrew Sullivan goes on the attack!

Andrew Sullivan has published his most forceful and exhaustive article today about Sarah Palin's faked pregnancy - although Andrew Sullivan is still "just asking questions" and is not officially on the record yet with saying that the pregnancy was faked.

He writes on the Daily Dish ("Palin Puts The Trig Question Back On The Table"):

(...) Palin has never produced Trig's birth certificate or a single piece of objective medical evidence that proves he is indeed her biological son. A child with Down Syndrome must have a pile of such records, tests, assessments and ultrasounds that conclusively prove that he is Sarah's biological son. It seems bizarre to me that neither the public nor the campaign (so far as I can glean) has ever been given one of them.

Her doctor, Catherine Baldwin Johnson, offered a two-page summary of Palin's health just hours before polls opened on November 3, a bizarre approach to transparency. The summary omits certain details from Palin's medical history (two miscarriages, one serious), and does not provide any actual documentary evidence of the pregnancy and birth. It was authored by a doctor who has refused to return any phone calls, even from the New York Times, since the moment Palin's candidacy was announced. The hospital has three recorded births on the day Trig was born: the governor's son, by wishes of the parents, was not included on the list. There were only a handful of photographs over eight months that showed Palin pregnant, none showed her as visibly pregnant as with her previous children, and at seven months, her entire staff and all of Alaska's political class disbelieved her:

People just couldn't believe the news. "Really? No!" said Bethel state Rep. Mary Nelson, who is close to giving birth herself ... "It's wonderful. She's very well-disguised," said Senate President Lyda Green, a mother of three who has sometimes sparred with Palin politically. "When I was five months pregnant, there was absolutely no question that I was with child."

On the return flight from Dallas to Alaska, which she says she boarded despite having contractions at eight months - a "strange sensation" she had never felt before, according to "Going Rogue," - the flight attendants on the plane at the time, according to a contemporaneous account in the ADN, had no idea she was even pregnant, let alone in labor of some kind. The questions about this astonishing story are not a function of conspiracy theories and never were. They require no elaborate theory of whose child Trig may actually be. They are simply basic questions anyone would ask of a person who had recounted such an amazing tale. And yet not a single journalist has done so.(...)"

Read Andrew Sullivan's post HERE.

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185 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sarah Palin put the topic back on the table herself. Well done, Palin. She couldn't take Rove's advice and be quiet about her "personal troubles."

And so karma calls....

Anonymous said...

Compare the April 8 to the March 26 (square pillow) pic. Where did the "baby" go between March 26 and April 8? It's cool how she was able to become unpregnant at will during her pregnancy with Trig.
ltl

Haha! wv = whorimbi (I will not go there, I will not go there, I will not go there)

Anonymous said...

Best Picture for newbies

Anonymous said...

Where can I find a link to the post that was done months ago showing Sarah's entire calendar for 2008?

Anonymous said...

This is OT, but must be shared:

"Doctors have closely examined Gov. Palin's head, and found nothing there."

It's from an article quoted at And so it goes ....
ltl

Patrick said...

We haven't got the "entire calendar" for 2008, unfortunately.

What we have can be downloaded from this folder:

Sarah Palin’s official calendar and other documents

See also the links on the right-hand side on palingates, where it says:

EXTRA BABYGATE RESOURCES

Photos

Documents and sound files from early 2008:

Children's travel authorizations
Sarah Palin's official schedule
Folder with various documents for download

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO SARAH
PALIN TALKING ABOUT THE WILD RIDE
ON APRIL 22, 2008

Dianne said...

Why are we trying to shut this woman up? She's her own worst enemy. Let her talk.

Anonymous said...

More from Sullivan:

This blog has attempted to give Palin the benefit of the doubt on this from the get-go. The Dish was one of the first blogs to post a photograph - of only four - showing Palin somewhat pregnant. At the time, on August 31, 2008, I asked:

Please give us these answers - and provide medical records for Sarah Palin's pregnancy - and put this to rest.

A short time later, I asked simply:

What harm would it do to release the medical records showing that Sarah Palin delivered Trig on April 18 in Wasilla? This is not hard: there must be an obstetrician, medical records, and data that can easily refute this rumor. It is not out of the ordinary either: candidates routinely issue medical records. So let's have them. And then we can move on.

On September 3, Palin was cut off from the press for the following reasons:

In an extraordinary and emotional interview, Steve Schmidt said his campaign feels "under siege" by wave after wave of news inquiries that have questioned whether Palin is really the mother of a 4-month-old baby, whether her amniotic fluid had been tested and whether she would submit to a DNA test to establish the child's parentage.


The whole thing is a must read. I hadn't ever heard she'd been cut off from the press because of babygate. I also don't remember anyone asking back then for DNA tests, certainly not the MSM. Back then, the MSM was busy bashing dKos for posting pictures of Bristol and making evil suggestions.

Very weird reasoning for cutting her off from the press.
ltl

emrysa said...

great post, patrick. that side-by-side is a great one.

gave birth 10 days later to a 6lb 2oz baby - suuuure!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Sarah,

SHOW US THE PAPER!

Wait, you can't - unless you're really going to go for some actionable fraud.

You got a birth certificate all right. Problem is, the date doesn't match the story you've told.

Someone who knows will talk someday. It's too late to dig yourself out of this pile of lies.

Free advice for Todd: Your book would be even more of a blockbuster than Sarah's. Just wait until the ink is dried to do the deal.

For now, Todd, will you put some socks and shoes on TriG, PLEASE? Better yet, take the kid home to the nanny, who at least, is providing him with a loving and calm routine.

Dianne said...

I can play troll.....

Sarah did not give birth to Trig!

Sarah did not give birth to Trig!

Sarah did not give birth to Trig!

Sarah did not give birth to Trig!

sjk from the belly of the plane said...

tick tock....times about up.

Duncan said...

Thanks Patrick,

I got dizzy reading so much about Larry King.

Anonymous said...

That's right, we want to see the medical records with signatures of people who are willing to swear that you gave birth to Trig on April 18th. We want to hear medical personnel say they were present at the birth and they saw the child we know as Trig exit your body.

You can give them permission to do so, Sarah.

Are people willing to go that far out on a limb for you, Sarah? If it's true you (and they) have nothing to worry about.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Re: adoption, birth certificate said...

April 8 to Aptil 13 photos WOW!
They say plenty!!!!
+++++++

"---So WHY would Sarah Palin adopt and carry around a child that is no relation to her?

---And yes I will keep working on getting my information out to the public as well. We have made a lot of very good progress lately, and yes we are getting closer.

---Update 3: I just got off of the phone with Alaska Center for Resource Families, which provides information about foster care and adoptions in Alaska, and learned a few facts.

For instance once you adopt a child the birth certificate ONLY has the name of the adoptive parents and the name of the child, which can be their original name or, if you want, have your last name.. In all respects it looks EXACTLY like any other birth certificate.

But one interesting point, and I asked this specifically, is that the birth certificate CANNOT change the actually birth date of the child. In other words, if you faked a birth and needed a child that was born on...oh let's say....April 18, 2008, you MUST find a child born on that EXACT day in order to present a birth certificate that matched your story.

I have discussed the reasons WHY Palin would not have been willing to present a birth certificate in the past, and THIS seems to be the main reason. If little Trig was born on some other day than the one that Palin identified, and notified the news to report as accurate, that would be a very big hole in her story."

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

LOL! Cutting and pasting Don Quixote analysis is not helping your case. It is only proving our point. Don Quixote indeed.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

ALERT said...

Moderators, you are being cyber attacked.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

Thanks to the poster who said we could right click after "Anonymous said..." Very helpful.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

Oh sad little troll...it will take only a short while to clean up your repeat posting, but that comparison picture of Sarah is going nowhere. That's right--there's nothing you can do about it.

And notice how in the first pic, there's a long gap between the bottom of her chest and the point where her belly should start...in fact, it runs right past the point where her belly DOES start just a few days later.

Hmmm...now how did THAT happen?

Kathleen said...

lol you don't say!

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Ripley said...

wow. you've certainly stirred up the bees nest here. If I were you, I'd ban that IP. Save us all, and you new readers, a lot of time.

WV= matswall, like as in Mat-su valley wall? Hmmmm

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[2] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, truth, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[3] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[4] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the superlative — for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

Anonymous said...

Keep posting your stupid little post trying to disrupt the page. In the meantime, this is going to stick. Now we now why the lawyer posted about Ethics complaints on Facebook. They knew this doozy was coming today and it's going to nail her to the wall.

Sorry Sarah and Van Flein, this isn't going away. Andrea's gotchya now!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/12/04/palin-gets-another-ethics_n_380688.html

Anonymous said...

Wow they really are worried, aren't they. They think they can beat us down with their garage repeats. HA

Anonymous said...

What kind of person does this? Seriously.

Anonymous said...

It's the same old troll; he did it before, remember? Exactly the same m.o.

Guess what, troll. You are indeed fighting windmills and she is a whore.

CC said...

What kind of person does this? A rabid-ignorant-koolaid-drinking-racist Palinbot ... that's who.

What a lovely segment of our society to have as a base. Well, they're just like their leader, after all.

Anonymous said...

And a BIG thanks to the spies at the College of the Ozarks. Took a lot of nerve to listen to that screech for an hour!!

Anonymous said...

3:07, yeah, except that they found her speaking manner "effective". They must be extremely nice people.

Anonymous said...

Somebody's running scared now. Maybe that's why Todd showed up today to take that poor baby back home to his Mother where he belongs instead of being used in Sarah's horse and pony show.

It's a damn shame that poor little boy has been turned into the only political capital she has and his whole life has been a sham. Damn shame.

Anonymous said...

Palin's is the troll's Dulcinea, and the troll is Don Quixote. RS McCain is Sancho. It all fits.

don't be a victim said...

Andrew Sullivan is a big threat.
Catherine Baldwin Johnson and Representative Carl Gatto are two names that are to be protected from public scrutiny.

EFF: don't be a victim ( cyber bullying )
http://www.eff.org/

http://www.eff-franchise.com/

Anonymous said...

oy...another one ... or possibly the same troll.

Anonymous said...

3:20, or Sarah. Don Quixote would fit in with her junior high reading experience, lol.

Sunshine1970 said...

Wow. Someone had a lot of time on their hands tonight, huh?

Anonymous said...

Not a troll. It is an attack. Remove the excess.

Anonymous said...

Here's another one Sarah isn't going to like. Conservative blogger says he was treatly rudely and poorly by Palin team at book singing in OK.

Ben's featuring on his blog over at Politico. Poor Sarah, why does everyone pick on such a nice lady? All she wants is to run the country with GOD as her VP, what's wrong with that?


http://oklahoma.watchdog.org/2009/12/04/sarah-palin-visits-norman-bookstore-press-tightly-controlled/

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

Ooooh, Latin! All sophisticated-like! Kinda East coast elitey, though!

Anonymous said...

That conservative blogger is an idiot. And note that he parts by saying that her "handlers" were not serving her well.

So, the handlers will be next under the bus.

She's so fragile (for a rogue maverick barracuda). LOL.

KaJo said...

Anonymous said @ 05 December 2009 01:59...Where can I find a link to the post that was done months ago showing Sarah's entire calendar for 2008?

Did you have the same idea I did? I was going to ask Patrick if he'd ever found evidence in any of the Palin calendars where she was signed out of the office to go to prenatal exams between June/July 2007 and April 2008.

Even if they existed, which I don't think they do, they wouldn't say "prenatal exam"... :)

Of course, she probably didn't designate her frequent trips 2 blocks to the Nordstrom's store in signing out as "shopping", either.

Anonymous said...

Listening to WTOP today on the way to work... they are quite "conservative" ... frequently calling Pres. Obama (Mr. Obama) ... anyhoo

FIRST story at the top of the hour
Palin admits to being a birther

Nothing about her Facebook recant...
:D

Anonymous said...

For each and every stupid pasted excerpt, I pledge to post a link to Palingates at Huffpo or somewhere in the cyberworld-at-large.

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

http://www.suberic.net/~marc/alesiusdelecta.html#adlauretanamxxxv

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Archivist said...

WOW .... toward the end of that piece, okwatchdog.com ... there is a mention of Alex Jones DVDs being distributed..

For those of you who don't know about Alex Jones I urge you to LOOK HIM UP ... if that bunch of loony tunes has identified the Palinbots as kindred spirits, then all hell will break loose now!!

Sarah has WELL and TRULY entered the Twilight ZOne now, if she is teaming up with Alex Jones' people!

................... WOW. Just WOW.

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

Okay. This is the sign. Palin is imploding. Thanks, troll.

Anonymous said...

This is a problem for Sarah. The birthers will claim her and then she'll have to go against them or risk the association.

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

conscious at last said...

Even our pathetic imperialist troll has got Sarah's number--

"Te voluisse quidem....

= You wish to QUIT !!!!(wink)

Anonymous said...

VII. AD QUANDAM
Te voluisse quidem mecum traducere vitam
et sperasse diu - dura loquella tua est.
Omnia facta mea culpa - mea pectora figis.
Ai, quod non licitum est posse dolore mori!


XVI. AD QUENDAM PROFESSOREM DE CREATIONE EX NIHILO
Subest nihil, si fit creatio vera.
Ergo professor tu creatus es vere.


XVIII. CHLOE
"Te iubeo salvere, Chloe, quam bella videris!
ut Phoebes nympha aut ipsa soror Clarii.
Vis aliquid faciamus? erit nostra una voluptas
inflammet quae nos solvat et una duos.

5 Annuis: exsulto: quid ais? vae! perdere me vis!
praeservativo cur sine non potis est?
Obsecro si quid amas me porta posteriore
accipe iam rigidum, ne misere peream.
Ne dubita: culi noli trepidare dolorem

10 ne doleat, poteris scandere me: recubo."
Tunc ut Parthus equum velox equitavit anhelum:
contingat talis saepe puella mihi!


XXXIII. AD LAURETANAM
Pulcris Lauretana tuis sum captus ocellis
me fixere suis mollibus heu! radiis.
Usque trahunt ad se flamma nunc pectus adustum
flammatum excipiant oro madore suo.


XXXIV. AD CORNUTUM
Quid Cornute putem, venuste noster,
quare sit tua dextra crassiore
forma tamque valens et Herculina
ut possis superare dodecathlon

5 dextra ista - tamen haud manu sinistra.
tenniludere num soles frequenter?
an tu fulmineus iacis veruta?
an certamine promines globorum?
an fortasse operaris in virectis

10 ferramentaque sunt tibi sueta
an quovis alio labore duro
exercere soles tuum lacertum?
an causa est, quod aves tuae maritae
semper cum solet ire ad emptiones

15 saccos ferre suavis aut canistra?
istorum nihil est. quid ergo? mos est
ipsum te nimium manu stuprare.


XXXV. AD LAURETANAM
Lauretana oculis frustra te luce requiro
at pulcram faciem sentio nocte tuam.
Somnia dant mihi te: non possum surgere lecto:
obsecro, Laura, meos redde benigna dies!

Anonymous said...

Vos es res adsuesco assuesco per a rabidus mulier. Vos es suus pignus. Vos es stultus. Tamen commodo subsisto quod utor vestri.

Read it and weep said...

Elephantus non capit murem.

Anonymous said...

vos es usura idem eadem idem english ut latin reddo ut EGO sum. LOL.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, that 5 days was a fast pregnancy. No wonder she said it was her easiest.

BTW, that way she is grinning is also how she looked when she was about 10-12 yrs old in a picture with her sister. Very posed -- not a typo, I didn't mean to write poised. Posed.

wolf's paw said...

Sarah and her followers are really between a rock and a hard place. Either she was pregnant and recklessly endangered the fetus by going on the wild-ride or she was not pregnant.

LisanTX said...

Rep. Gatto, Sarah's buddy, sponsored the bill allowing stillborn infants to receive a birth certificate. Did Bristol have a stillborn infant in late 2007 or early 2008?

I've also read that some shady adoption procedures can be pulled somehow using the death certificate for a a stillborn.

Anon., you're going to have to give us more clues to procede. Thanks.

sandra said...

Wow! I've learned a lot more about Don Quixote than I ever intended. And we though Desperate Housewives was the model. Boy, were we too 21st Century.

The latin would probably be something that Brianus Berkleius on Ocean of Urine could do. There may be a secret code in there, but my Latin is too out of touch to do anything.

Anonymous said...

They have been between a rock and a hard place for over a year. In the middle of that year, she quit her job. Then she wrote a book of lies, lawsuits against it pending...

Anonymous said...

The troll doesn't really understand Latin. He is trying to prove his "erudition," but it's just pathetic.

For cyber-bullying and spamming: eff.org.

Anonymous said...

WTF!!! I am fn amazed at the posts. What a perfect example of a Palinbot.

Anonymous said...

The troll Is using the same kind of english to latin translator I (3:41, 3:43) found online. Super clever, huh? Ha ha.

Anonymous said...

From Phil Munger at Progressive Alaska:

I live in Wasilla and will have known Sarah Palin for 19 years, come February 2010. The doctor, Cathy Baldwin-Johnson, who wrote the letter Palin alludes to in the latter's statement, "you need to prove that he's your kid, which we have done" was one of my wife's doctors for both of our kids, and was both kids' pediatrician.

CBJ, as she was often called locally, was a very public fixture around Wasilla up to the time of Trig's birth. Our daughter attended ballet with one of CBJ's kids for years, and I often saw CBJ somewhere or another around Wasilla or Anchorage at least once a week for well over a decade. Between the time of Trig's birth - early 2008 - and the issuance of the election eve letter purported to be from her, CBJ was far less evident. Since the letter was issued, CBJ has been unavailable to comment on it or on any other matter related to Trig and Sarah Palin:

Cathy Baldwin Johnson has never given a simple statement that Trig Palin was born at Mat-Su Hospital on April 18th, that Sarah Palin is his biological mother, and that she - Dr. Baldwin-Johnson - was physically present at the delivery. She would not do this at the following junctures:

1. Back in April, when Trig Palin was allegedly born. She gave ambiguous statements to the press about the circumstances of the birth (several of which contradicted explicitly statements Gov. Palin made) and then she clammed up.

2. On August 31st (when announcing it would have scotched the necessity of announcing – the next day – seventeen year old Bristol's pregnancy);

3. In the letter released before the election

4. To the ADN [Anchorage Daily News] in December when they asked AGAIN

http://progressivealaska.blogspot.com/2009/12/saradise-lost-book-4-chapter-20-crazy.html

Anonymous said...

anon @3:45
Yes, she looks completely out of character. It's a "here's a picture of me posing as pregnant" picture. How often is she posing alone in a photo. Most photos of her, she's either solo and in action, or posing with someone. If she's posing, it's for a reason. Here, there's only one apparent reason -- to demonstrate that she was pregnant. Why suddenly then after months of, in her words, hiding her pregnancy or not having to hide her pregnancy because she has such strong abs.

How many months after Trig was supposedly born did this photo show up?
ltl

Anonymous said...

Someone over at Bree's site had a good suggestion: send info (photos, etc) to factcheck to be fact checked. They'll look into it and post what they find.
Perhaps they'll have more luck getting Trig's BC or some medical records out of Mrs Palin ;)

wv = fluoxis -- sounds like a medication Mrs. Palin needs to take for her personality disorder.

CR46 said...

Does any regular blogger belong to Todds First Nation tribe? Because I have a question, I know all tribal governments have some differences and I can only go to my own tribe for my experiences...so hang on while I try and explain.... :)
I did adopt a son at age 6, civil adoption through the state...BUT I also had to present a case to my tribe (Fond Du Lac Tribe of Ojibwe) to get a tribal adoption to make my son a member ( which he is and has full ricing, hunting, and fishing rights on Tribal lands in Mn, too bad he lives in Tx)

So here's my question to anyone familiar w/ Todds tribe? Is Trig receiving medical benefits through Todds tribe? Has he been adopted(or do they even accept adoptions)?
If he hasn't been adopted through his tribe or can't be....any services he is receiving would fall into defrauding of the federal government for goods/services.
Just another angle for someone to maybe go after the truth.

Anonymous said...

The troll just posted the same Latin poem excerpt over and over; the troll does not read Latin. The link is posted above: http://www.suberic.net/~marc/alesiusdelecta.html#adlauretanamxxxv

The troll really dishonored the poet he quoted.

I think Munger's post is truly fascinating, deeply significant.

Anonymous said...

The sign that you are hitting a nerve is all of that unwanted traffic. Take it as a compliment that you are getting closer to the truth. If you weren't scoring big points, they wouldn't bother.

My husband was driving through a very red state on business, and the only talk radio he could listen to were the dear-friends-of-Sarah-network. Today (Friday) they were fuming; she may have signed a few books in Plano, TX but she stiffed many more. When those people are angry, calling into Right Wing Radio to complain about how badly they were treated, just sit back and enjoy the laugh. And, that woman wants to run a presidential campaign!

Anonymous said...

CR46, maybe you could post that question to Progressive AK? He has written supportive posts about AK First Nations members. He might know who to ask.

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

From the OK conservative blogger about Palin last night: "I can assure you that last night’s experience left a bad taste in the mouths of more than one reporter and photographer."

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

Sarah never showed any one a birth certificate. Even the "letter" from her doctor was inaccurate, or it would have included to two miscarriages. They would have been part of her medical history.

I agree with the comment that the birth certificate will show the names of Sarah and Todd as parents of Trig if he has been adopted by them. Yes, Sarah is Trig's Real Mother (now). What cannot be changed is the date and place of birth. No wonder we haven't seen it yet.

As for the woman who conceived and gave birth to Trig (or was he Tripp before he was Trig?), that is another question.

Sarah, you and/or your pals do read this website. I know that you want to prove to one and all that Trig is your own biological child and that you gave birth to him after a most extraordinary plane trip from Texas to Alaska. You can do us all a big favor by consenting to a DNA test involving you, Todd and Trig Palin.

After all, you are Trig's real mother; what's the harm? You once dared the ADN to a DNA test if they were willing to pay the hundreds of dollars that it cost. Your DNA test will cost you nothing; we will gladly take up a collection, and we will also want it to be supervised by acceptable authority- not your friendly, neighborhood doctor. Come on Sarah, DNA is the only way to prove that you are Trig's Real Mother.

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

Well if Stowers is the choice the Alaska Family Council was "hoping for" that is a pretty big red flag in my humble opinion. After all the AFC is "all anti-abortion, all of the time" and they would not be "hoping" for a candidate that they were not confident shared their agenda.

On the other hand Stowers WAS the judge who demanded that the state preserve Palin's e-mails until Andree McLeod could successfully sue for access. Of course Stowers was also the judge who recused himself from Andree's case when he was first under consideration for appointment to the Supreme Court, at that time by Sarah herself, back in June of this year.

On yet another hand HE was a founding partner of Clapp, Peterson and Stowers, which is now known as Clapp Peterson Van Flein Tiemessen & Thorsness, and is the law firm that represents Sarah Palin. (I believe I received a threat from Van Flein that featured their letterhead. If I am not mistaken.)

So is this an appointment that should concern progressives in Alaska? Let's look at the evidence. Palin lapdog appoints him, the Alaska Family Council salivates over him, and he seems to view the world, and the law, through a biblical prism. So yes we should be concerned.

Remember, just because Sarah Palin is gone does not mean her agenda is not continuing forward. Sean Parnell is easy to overlook because, well frankly, watching him is like watching paint dry. But the guy is cut from the same wacky cloth as Palin and we do ourselves a disservice not to keep a very close eye on him.

Anonymous said...

he "Christian Nation" Myth:

http://www.infidels.org/library/modern/farrell_till/myth.html

The primary leaders of the so-called founding fathers of our nation were not Bible-believing Christians; they were deists. Deism was a philosophical belief that was widely accepted by the colonial intelligentsia at the time of the American Revolution. Its major tenets included belief in human reason as a reliable means of solving social and political problems and belief in a supreme deity who created the universe to operate solely by natural laws. The supreme God of the Deists removed himself entirely from the universe after creating it. They believed that he assumed no control over it, exerted no influence on natural phenomena, and gave no supernatural revelation to man. A necessary consequence of these beliefs was a rejection of many doctrines central to the Christian religion. Deists did not believe in the virgin birth, divinity, or resurrection of Jesus, the efficacy of prayer, the miracles of the Bible, or even the divine inspiration of the Bible.

These beliefs were forcefully articulated by Thomas Paine in Age of Reason, a book that so outraged his contemporaries that he died rejected and despised by the nation that had once revered him as "the father of the American Revolution." To this day, many mistakenly consider him an atheist, even though he was an out spoken defender of the Deistic view of God. Other important founding fathers who espoused Deism were George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Ethan Allen, James Madison, and James Monroe.

Fundamentalist Christians are currently working overtime to convince the American public that the founding fathers intended to establish this country on "biblical principles," but history simply does not support their view. The men mentioned above and others who were instrumental in the founding of our nation were in no sense Bible-believing Christians. Thomas Jefferson, in fact, was fiercely anti-cleric.
Jefferson was just as suspicious of the traditional belief that the Bible is "the inspired word of God." He rewrote the story of Jesus as told in the New Testament and compiled his own gospel version known as The Jefferson Bible, which eliminated all miracles attributed to Jesus and ended with his burial. The Jeffersonian gospel account contained no resurrection. . . . Writing to Adams again, Jefferson said, "And the day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the supreme being as his father in the womb of a virgin, will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter" (April 11, 1823). These were hardly the words of a devout Bible-believer.

pearlygirl said...

Love the new pic, Patrick. Perhaps one of the square pillow before would be sweet. The incredible morphing abs of Sarah Palin

Shame about the troll, but so easy to scroll through---pretty pointless overall----Loved the reply in Latin from one of our own. I never studied Latin but since a good part of English and French is based in it, I can identify enough parts to get the gist---very funny

conscious at last said...

SARAH-- THIS MUST BE VERY

EMBARRASSING FOR YOU.

wolf's paw said...

On another occasion, Bill McAllister, a communications aide to the governor, sent an email to the McCain campaign asking for guidance about what Palin's position should be on abortion.

"I need to verify what's being said on the governor's behalf regarding two social issues," McAllister writes. "On abortion, she is pro-life, but does she oppose exceptions for rape and incest? On sex education, does she favor an abstinence-only approach or does she allow for contraceptives?"

---

This is rich. Palin asking McCain what her views should be on abortion and sex education.

Palin Gets Another Ethics Charge.

---

BTW, can we get another ethics charge over Meg Stapleton (a state employee) using state resources to issue a press release condemning Levi Johnston?

Anonymous said...

Palin arrived LATE IN OKLAHOMA. Was she too depressed to meet the crowd? From the OK conservative blogger's account:

"While Palin was expected at 6 p.m., her bus did not arrive until well after 7 p.m. and she did not speak as we were told she would. No explanation. She merely exited the bus with her young son Trig in her arms and quickly went inside. The press was then kept outside for another 15 minutes before we were allowed in in shifts, where we could only take still pictures or some video. No questions.

Red Dirt Report, a sister site to Oklahoma Watchdog, did get a story [1] out of the event but the experience was less than optimal. Palin’s publicist and entourage were not particularly helpful and seemed even disdainful of the press. This could be due to recent reports [2] that Palin is being tightly controlled by her handlers and that she is not talking to the press and not allowing fans to ask questions. A report [3] out of Minnesota says that “only English-speaking press” would be allowed to cover her tour, although this was spun as being a simple misunderstanding.


Once inside the Hastings Norman store, and out of the cold, the press was allowed only pictures. Of course her many fans were excited to get her autograph in their copies of Going Rogue.

After a few minutes the press was hustled back outside.

The experience left this watchdog wondering why Palin – who claims to be a folksy, woman-of-the-people – would not be more accessible?"

Silver said...

Palin still sending out Trig birth announcements seven months after his "birth":

"But we also found someone in line who says Sarah Palin changed her life. Last year Natalie Nichols of Texarkana cast the first vote of her life for the McCain-Palin ticket. After the election, she wrote a letter to Palin, thanking her for her example. She never expected to get the response she did.

"I got this birth announcement from Trig, with this note on the back of it," Nichols said. She took that note, made an iron-on decal from it, and put it on her shirt."
"Going Rogue" tour stops in Texas

martona said...

somebody please delete the repeated comments that have nothing to do with this post. probably someone trying to sabotage the thread of the comments.

CGinWI said...

The right click on the spam doesn't work for me, but if I left click on the icon to the left of "anonymous" the comment collapses. Makes it really quick and easy to scroll past the repeat postings.

And yes, you must be hitting a nerve somewhere. Good job!

Anonymous said...

@ CR46
Just google Alaska Native adoption laws. That should answer your question.

Anonymous said...

martona said... somebody please delete the repeated comments that have nothing to do with this post. probably someone trying to sabotage the thread of the comments.

I'm with you martona.

No one allows spam to remain, it says victim hood. Don't know why they are so slow.

I use to love the comments at Palingates.

Anonymous said...

Um, it's the wee hours of the morning in Europe - Patrick is probably getting some well deserved sleep. Patience.

Anonymous said...

04:35

Did Todd appear after that? I hear her bed rm is a pharmacy, the meds should work.

Anonymous said...

Yes, I second the notion that the spam will be removed later. But for now it serves as a grand testimony to how much fear Palin and her minions have about Andrew Sullivan's investigation.

GO ANDREW. GO PALINGATES!!

crystalwolf aka caligrl said...

Trolls are spamming b/c they are getting worried for their queen Teabagger!
I'm sure Patrick will remove the spam as soon as he can. You have to know these Trolls know Palingates is being monitored by MSM and are trying to stifle free speech!
EPIC FAIL

Anonymous said...

@ 5:00

Oh, poor widdle you "use to" love the comments here at Palingates before Patrick and Regina fell down on the job of deleting Palinbot hissy fits, lo these many minutes ago? Oh, woe is you, whatever shall you do...perhaps wait till morning and they will be gone. Maybe go back to Cee4Pee while you wait??

Anonymous said...

Who says her bedroom is a pharmacy?
That I hadn't heard before.
She does look more normal tonight with Todd there. Makes me wonder if he keeps her taking whatever meds she needs. She was looking quite deranged the past few days. She was acting it, too, but that's normal for her.

Don't worry about the trolls. Patrick cleaned up several other threads this evening that had been similarly attacked before, I'm guessing, going to bed.
The troll seems to have been sent to bed as well for the moment.
ltl

Anonymous said...

If she's going to produce a birth certificate, could she pony up with a college diploma while she's at it.

I don't know why, but I'm starting to think she never actually graduated.

Reesie said...

Patrick, FYI, the palinbot who is scamming about Stower was copied and pasted from Gryphen's blog. I think someone is trying to start some infighting. Don't let that happen.

I started reading the Alaskan blogs when I was reading Huffingtonpost when Ms. Palin was nominated by McCain. I read first mudflats, immoralminority, palindeceptions, palingates and then breepalin in that order.

I truly believe that this scammer is trying to start some infighting. Don't let that happen.

Anonymous said...

Anon @ 5:22
It would speak well of whatever the last college she attended was if she didn't actually graduate.

OT for this thread, but on the topic of her demanding to be addressed as governor, I stayed at a hotel in San Diego a while back that had photos near the elevators of the owners (I guess) posing with various Republican mucky mucks. Several of these were posed with Katharine Harris, the elections official from Florida 2000, and later US Rep from Fla. Anyway, in each of the photos, she was referred to as US Senator Katharine Harris. I thought it was pretty amusing as yes, she did announce her campaign to run for Senate, and then was forced to pull out by the Republican party within a few months of announcing back in 2004 or 6 (can't remember which), but the hotel has certainly had enough time to change its photo labels, and it's not like she even came close to ever being a Senator. This title inflation seems to be a fad among some fundie right wingers.
ltl

Anonymous said...

The troll is trying to shut down the open forum. Some amazing anonymous info comes through, you see, in an open forum, and that is a threat to the massive Palin cover-ups. Palingates is the perfect name for this blog. How many more miles until Waterloo?

Anonymous said...

I personally think the video from Plano shows Sarah looking unnaturally energetic, shall we say? Btw, does anyone remember the photo of Levi where he was holding Tripp on one arm, as an infant - but the picture had been cropped, and at some point it was determined that he was holding another baby on the other arm? I can't remember if someone had captured the complete picture on line, or if there was enough left for us to figure it out. I also am wondering if people had determined a date for the picture.

Anonymous said...

I don't know all the ins and outs of running a blog, but it's supposed to be a good sign if the blog has great traffic. People would want to advertise in a place with great traffic. So, pesky poster has been doing Palingates a favor by boosting their ratings.

Unfortunately, he/she is also trying to crash the website. Hope the guy who set up the blog has built in safeguards. You seem to be holding up to the wasted space.

And, it is a sign of how good your material is that someone wants to disturb the traffic. Sarah did not ever show a birth certificate, and she has not provided any real acceptable proof that she actually conceived and gave birth to Trig.

Maybe we should be bombarding some of Sarah's favorite websites with requuest for DNA DNA DNA, what do you say? DNA (It's supporsed to sound like a cheer).

Anonymous said...

"Energetic" can also be the "manic" phase.

AKPetMom said...

It's as simple as this. Other women look pregnant way before the week before birth. Sarah Palin only looked pregnant one week before birth.

In keeping with the wisdom put forth scientifically by Occam's Razor (the simplest explanation is usually the right one) we can scientifically ascertain that Palin was not pregnant when she said she was.

She could have been pregnant at some point and delivered earlier than she said or she never was pregnant. Fact is she was not pregnant when she said she was. No way, no how. Biology does not work that way.

Anonymous said...

I completely agree - you are seeing more trouble here than ever before because folks who feel very, very threatened by what you are doing are trying to sabotage the site (duh). They are trying to start trouble between posters, or just give the illusion of conflict by posting the back and forth of fake debates. I use it as important feedback, actually, like "hot" and "cold" in that old game. The warmer we get, the more they come out.

Anonymous said...

Anon @5:49, agreed. She's riding pretty high right now, that's for sure! Wonder if/when she'll crash.

Anonymous said...

Someone is really ticked-off with this blog. I guess the truth is too much for him/her to handle. Must be having a nervous break-down. This forum is about finding out the truth and free speech and if you don't like it go elsewhere where you belong.

Anonymous said...

Thank you, ANDREW SULLIVAN, for going with the story!

Thanks, Patrick and Regina and Kathleen, and whole team!

Anonymous said...

If you asked me to produce my birth certificate - I would, not politely, tell you to f**k off!

If you kept asking me...I would keep telling you to f**k off!

If you persisted...I would tell you to f**k off! Because, by now, I would probably enjoy telling you to f**k off!

Eeeevveennttuuuaaaalllllyy, I would get annoyed enough to just show you. Just to get you out of my life. And, my logic would be...what do you get out of seeing my BC? The name of the state, hospital, location, etc. My birthname. Ho-hum. You can see the prints of my hands and feet. What else? My social security number? No. My bank account? No. My investments? No. My what? What? And, if I, rightly, suspected an identity-theft situation - I would be on top of it. Not really that difficult.

This is just so stupid.

And, btw, H/T to Andrew. The criticism that he's been getting are so unreal. The right-wing nuts are real tough when hiding in cyberspace. When the sh*t hits reality - I promise you...liberals are a lot tougher than you little-d*ck "real" Americans.

Anonymous said...

Patrick's post is great. The people who love this blog will not be bothered with the massive spam. It will only be new readers who may get disgusted with the spam comments.

It is a back handed compliment that they spam you. They are scared.

Anonymous said...

Wait until her bus and plane staff start posting her about diva bs

MacAndCheeseWiz said...

Andrew Sullivan is right.

Thanks for the photo evidence, and hearing her account of the wild ride was a nightmare. Does she realize all these things are hidden in secret archives and countless computers across the country?

I think she's protesting too much !


T

Anonymous said...

Wow...Regina, Kathleen and Patrick....you must have hit paydirt.....getting too close to the truth. They are running scared. Interesting that Todd has shown up after weeks..is he there to protect his part of the $5 million advance? Is there a deal that he will fake being the loyal husband role until all the money is in from the book?

Palin's......Karma is rearing it's head. Lies, lies and more lies....you will pay dearly now.

Take her home Todd...she is unraveling. Someone in that family needs to intervene and get her to a doctor.

Archivist said...

Anon 8:01

Nobody needs to 'get Sarah to a Doctor' ... she can just phone it in, you know?

She has magical Doctors who can examine, diagnose and see into the future right from any hotel room!

Anonymous said...

Maybe Todd showed up to get Trig according to a custody/visitation agreement?